Wednesday, February 9, 2011

1974 Giro d'Italia (part 3)

Some rough roads. This was only 35 years ago, but some modern riders would whine and complain if they had to ride the ‘Strada Bianche’.  Of course the older European geometry might have been more geared for this than modern short wheelbase frames.  I'll leave that to those who know more than I do.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

I think it's been well established that the tried and true Old World geometry planes in all conditions, sticks to the tarmac like glue when coming off Ventoux in a sirocco while eating a sandwich of jambon et fromage. A properly raked and silver-soldered fork just absorbs deep potholes, cattle guards, large roadkill carcasses and other typical hazards of the average recreational ride. A modern road machine, on the other hand--well it might look fast in the shop, but as soon as you try to turn it the wooden, nonplaning cookie-cutter frameset resists all rider input, and the straight outsourced forks are known to often kick, snap and buck unsuspecting riders over twenty feet into the air. It is a shame that millionaire professional racers have to ride whatever their sponsors provide. You would take drugs too in their shoes.

mw

Gunnar Berg said...

You been drinking Jan Heine's bier?

Anonymous said...

Just a humble, everyday cyclotouriste extraordinaire. Et vous?

mw

Gunnar Berg said...

Seriously, I don't know enough about it. I have ridden bikes that ride well and others that don't. I have never experienced "planing", possibly because I don't ride fast enough.

Then again, it is possible that Herr Heine is drinking Kool-Aid and thinks it's French wine.

Anonymous said...

I have, once or twice, made the mistake of buying bikes that didn't fit.

Otherwise, my bikes, represent many different on road and off road interests--old school and new school--and all have done exactly what I wanted them to do within my own ability. I haven't read Mr. Heine much, but have not found his obsessions interesting.

best,
mw